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wiki:backup - Tiny Core Linux Wiki

Welcome to the Tiny Core Linux Wiki at tinycorelinux.net!

Backup

Backup may be used to save files and settings in Tinycore.

Time taken to Start Up and Shut Down

The more you have in backup, the longer it will take to start up and shut down Tinycore.

For quicker start up and shut down, minimize the size of backup, or if installed on a hard drive, don't use backup at all.

Select What is Saved During Backup

The file /opt/.filetool.lst contains a list of files and directories saved during backup. The file /opt/.xfiletool.lst contains a list of files and directories within those in /opt/.filetool.lst excluded from being saved during backup.

You can add the names of files and directories to, or remove the names of files and directories from, /opt/.filetool.lst and /opt/.xfiletool.lst to determine what is saved during backup.

To edit /opt/.filetool.lst or /opt/.xfiletool.lst use a Root Text Editor. Open the terminal and type

sudo editor

Include the directories relative to the root directory, and leave out the leading /.

Safe Backup

When shutting down Tinycore, you may select Safe Backup. This saves the previous backup as mydatabk.tgz, and creates a new backup.

To save additional backup files, see

Change the Name of the Backup File

By default, files are backed up in a file called mydata.tgz.

If you are using version 3.6 or higher, you can change the name of the backup file.

To change the name of the backup file, include “mydata=other-name” boot code in the bootloader.

If you don't want to use Backup

If you don't want to use backup, include the “norestore” boot option in the bootloader.

When using Persistent /home and /opt

When using persistent home and opt you may choose not to use backup at all, by including the “norestore” boot option in the bootloader.

If you do use backup, all references to the home and opt directories can be removed from /opt/.filetool.lst. In the version I am using, that is everything. Then add the names of other files and directories you want in backup to /opt/.filetool.lst.

Other Ways to save Files and Settings

Files and settings may also be saved by:

1. Making extensions for settings. For more information, see Make Extensions for Settings.

2. Saving in /opt. For an example of this, see Tinycore Passwords.

Exclude Anything Unnecessary from Backup

Exclude anything unnecessary from backup. Following are examples.

Files which Don't Change

You may make extensions for files which don't change, particularly large ones, and exclude them from backup.

To list large files in /home/tc, open the terminal and use

/home/tc/ -type f -size +1M | xargs ls -lhS

For more information, see Make Extensions for Settings.

Internet Browser Cache

Most Internet browsers save cache in /home/tc. If this is included in backup, it may take a long time. You may want to exclude Internet browser cache from backup.

Xfe and Backup

If you use Xfe file manager, it saves files and directories you delete in trash. If you backup /home/tc, this is included in backup. The more you delete, the longer backup takes. To avoid this, add the following line to /opt/.xfiletool.lst.

home/tc/.xfe

You may also edit the preferences in Xfe, to permanently delete files instead of adding them to trash. To do this, go to Edit, then Preferences. Click the square preceeding “Include a command to bypass the trash can (permanent delete),” to tick it. Then click “Accept.”

Extract a Backup File

You normally access a backup by starting the computer, and restoring it.

Backup files can also be extracted manually.

Backup files are normally saved in the tce directory (somewhere like /mnt/sda1/tce).

To access the contents of a backup, create a new directory and copy the backup file to it. Open the terminal and type

cd directory
tar -xvf backup-name

Using Commands

To run backup, open the terminal and use

filetool.sh -b

To restore files in backup, use

filetool.sh -r

To list files that will be in backup and their size, use

filetool.sh -d

To find out where backup is saved, use

cat /opt/.backup_device

Also see

Print/export